Update on Amendments

Amazing news!
 
The amendment we have been campaigning for (Amendment 7) has gained support from Conservative, Labour, Lib Dem, SNP and Green parties – this means there is a good chance it will be called for debate.
 
We still need as many MPs as possible to sign it, and build support for the other amendment we are backing (New Clause 4) to show the Government that they do not have a mandate to do as they wish.
 
The committee stage was supposed to have started by now but the Government has delayed the vote to give the whips time to work on those who are standing up for our Parliamentary Democracy.
 
So it is as important now as ever before to contact your MP and tell them you are grateful (if they have signed – see below) or that they should be supporting this if they haven’t. 
 
The government is worried that they are losing support on these key issues – and they should be! We need a concerted effort to show that we want our Parliament to have the final say.
 
With the prospects of a no-deal Hard Brexit rising by the day, it’s even more important that the Government stays accountable, and Parliament has to APPROVE any exit deal – including leaving without a deal. So please keep up the good work and together we can restore Parliamentary Democracy.
 
The amendments we are supporting are even making the national news!

Let’s now raise the profile higher so the government cannot ignore the issue.

 

(For up to date signatories, please refer to the most recent Amendment paper on the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill Documents page.)

Signatories at time of writing:
Amendment 7

Kinnock, Stephen (Labour) – Aberavon
Grieve, Mr Dominic (Conservative) – Beaconsfield
McCabe, Steve (Labour) – Birmingham, Selly Oak
Cadbury, Ruth (Labour) – Brentford and Isleworth
Lucas, Caroline (Green Party) – Brighton, Pavilion
McCarthy, Kerry (Labour) – Bristol East
Neill, Robert (Conservative) – Bromley and Chislehurst
Soubry, Anna (Conservative) – Broxtowe
Stone, Jamie (Liberal Democrat) – Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross
Doughty, Stephen (Labour (Co-op)) – Cardiff South and Penarth
Jones, Susan Elan (Labour) – Clwyd South
Hayes, Helen (Labour) – Dulwich and West Norwood
Sandbach, Antoinette (Conservative) – Eddisbury
Murray, Ian (Labour) – Edinburgh South
Bradshaw, Mr Ben (Labour) – Exeter
Malhotra, Seema (Labour (Co-op)) – Feltham and Heston
Gapes, Mike (Labour (Co-op)) – Ilford South
Kendall, Liz (Labour) – Leicester West
Morgan, Nicky (Conservative) – Loughborough
Farrelly, Paul (Labour) – Newcastle-under-Lyme
McKinnell, Catherine (Labour) – Newcastle upon Tyne North
Gethins, Stephen (Scottish National Party) – North East Fife
Smith, Angela (Labour) – Penistone and Stocksbridge
Bryant, Chris (Labour) – Rhondda
Clarke, Mr Kenneth (Conservative) – Rushcliffe
Allen, Heidi (Conservative) – South Cambridgeshire
Lefroy, Jeremy (Conservative) – Stafford
Coffey, Ann (Labour) – Stockport
Umunna, Chuka (Labour) – Streatham
Wollaston, Dr Sarah (Conservative) – Totnes
Hammond, Stephen (Conservative) – Wimbledon
Lady Hermon (Independent) – North Down
Mary Creagh (Labour) – Wakefield
Lammy, Mr David (Labour) – Tottenham
Mr George Howarth (Labour) – Knowsley
Sir Vince Cable (Lib Dem) – Twickenham
Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) – East Dunbartonshire
Tom Brake (Lib Dem) – Carshalton and Wallington
Sir Edward Davey (Lib Dem) – Kingston and Surbiton
Layla Moran (Lib Dem) – Oxford West and Abingdon

New Clause 4

Coyle, Neil (Labour) – Bermondsey and Old Southwark
Cadbury, Ruth (Labour) – Brentford and Isleworth
Lucas, Caroline (Green Party) – Brighton, Pavilion
Doughty, Stephen (Labour (Co-op)) – Cardiff South and Penarth
Hayes, Helen (Labour) – Dulwich and West Norwood
Murray, Ian (Labour) – Edinburgh South
Bradshaw, Mr Ben (Labour) – Exeter
Kyle, Peter (Labour) – Hove
Gapes, Mike (Labour (Co-op)) – Ilford South
Kendall, Liz (Labour) – Leicester West
Farrelly, Paul (Labour) – Newcastle-under-Lyme
McKinnell, Catherine (Labour) – Newcastle upon Tyne North
Leslie, Mr Chris (Labour (Co-op)) – Nottingham East
Bryant, Chris (Labour) – Rhondda
Coffey, Ann (Labour) – Stockport
Umunna, Chuka (Labour) – Streatham
Lammy, Mr David (Labour) – Tottenham
Sir Vince Cable (Lib Dem) – Twickenham
Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) – East Dunbartonshire
Tom Brake (Lib Dem) – Carshalton and Wallington
Sir Edward Davey (Lib Dem) – Kingston and Surbiton
Layla Moran (Lib Dem) – Oxford West and Abingdon

Vital amendments to the EU Withdrawal Bill

The following proposed amendments to the EU Withdrawal Bill stipulate that there must be an Act of Parliament to approve the terms of the UK’s exit before we can leave the EU.
These are therefore the two amendments that are vital in order to keep our options open and give Parliament a meaningful vote.
Amendment 7
Clause 9, page 6, line 45, at end insert “, subject to the prior enactment of a statute by Parliament approving the final terms of withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union.”
Member’s explanatory statement
To require the final deal with the EU to be approved by statute passed by Parliament.
 
And
 
NC4
To move the following Clause-
“Arrangements for withdrawing from the EU
Notwithstanding any powers granted under this Act, no Minister of the Crown may agree to the arrangements for the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union referred to in Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union until Royal Assent is granted to an Act of Parliament—
(a) authorising the Minister to agree to an exit day to be specified in the Act,
(b) authorising the Minister to agree to those arrangements that will apply after exit day, the arrangements to be specified in the Act.”
Member’s explanatory statement
This new clause would ensure that a separate Act of Parliament would be required for Ministers to determine exit day and to set out the arrangements that will apply after exit day.

Help us fight Theresa May’s damaging Hard Brexit

In her Florence speech, Theresa May confirmed her commitment to leave the Single Market and Customs Union – dedicating herself to a damaging Hard Brexit that will make us all poorer.
 
And she repeated her claim that no deal was better than a bad deal – effectively threatening to just walk away. And with her EU Withdrawal Bill currently before Parliament, she can do that on a whim. She could storm out of the talks on Monday and then formally leave the EU on the Tuesday – just because she felt like it.
 

That is the power that this bill currently gives her. For all her talk about parliamentary sovereignty, this bill is designed to by-pass Parliament. It’s a monstrosity that represents the single largest power grab by a government in modern political history.

We believe that we live in a Parliamentary Democracy and such decisions must be taken by parliament – not Mrs May.

Join the fight!

The good news is that this bill has NOT YET been passed. It is at the Committee stage where the bill can be amended to make it reasonable. Approximately 150 amendments have been tabled that address the issues that you will be concerned about – including a very important one by Conservative and former Attorney General, Dominic Grieve. It stipulates that there must be an Act of Parliament to approve the terms of the UK’s exit before we can leave the EU.

Parliament returns in the second week of October and we are organising people to lobby their MPs to support these amendments so that the Government stays accountable, and Parliament has to approve any exit deal – including leaving without a deal.

That’s what Represent Us is now campaigning for. 

Sign up to the campaign and we will send you details of how to take effective action. 
 

Amending the EU Withdrawal Bill

Much has happened this week; and you may think most of what you have heard has been bad. But this is far from the full picture!

Read on to see how you can help Represent Us fight to keep our EU options open, and maintain Parliamentary control….

In its current form the EU withdrawal bill is indeed a monstrosity that represents the biggest power grab by a government in modern political history. It is a badly worded, open-ended Enabling Act allowing the government to do pretty much whatever it wants to virtually anything that is covered by current European legislation without Parliament’s permission – including altering the Act itself!

It would also allow the government to walk out of talks and then take us out of the European Union with no trade deal and no alternative arrangements in place on a ministerial whim. So it is pretty awful.

But the thing to remember at this point is that it has NOT been passed; and most of Parliament – including a significant number of Conservatives – are fully aware of how awful the bill is and have explicitly said that they will not pass it in its current form.

The vote on Monday was merely the second reading – a stage where Parliament is effectively saying “do we need a law on this subject”? On that question, it is hard to say no if you are planning to leave the European Union; and that is why it was passed at that stage.

The next stage is key because this is where the bill can be amended to make it reasonable. Many – including some very significant Conservatives such as the former Attorney General, Dominic Grieve, have put down amendments to address all of the issues that you will be concerned about. This includes stipulating that there must be an Act of Parliament approving the terms of the UK’s exit. They have also said that they will NOT support the bill unless it is amended.

The initial vote on these amendments will probably be in October. In that time we should all be campaigning and lobbying our MPs to support these amendments so that the government stays accountable and Parliament has the final say on any deal or on leaving without a deal.

That’s what we should be doing and it is what Represent Us is now campaigning for. Please join us to help ensure that Parliament retains control and we will send you more details of how best you can help.